wu li ting market & a sunday invigilation

Saturday, November 8:  This was a weird weekend, or rather a non-weekend, as, for the third time since I arrived in China, the university required us to work on a Sunday.  For our midterm exams, the administration decided to test out a new computerized British Council test on Vocabulary, Reading and Listening, for which a lot of computer labs were needed.  We had to give the exams on Sunday, as the computer labs were booked during the weekdays.  That’s the story anyway.

Wu li ting market

Wu li ting market

As you can imagine, I wasn’t one bit happy about this.  The thing that made it a double blow was that classes were cancelled on Friday and Saturday due to Sports Day, meaning that if we hadn’t had to invigilate for the exams, we could have had a three-day weekend, and I could have possibly traveled somewhere.

Wu li ting market

Wu li ting market

oranges

oranges

There were two bits of saving grace: one, it rained all weekend and I would have probably had a miserable journey if I had gone away; and two, we were told we get to take off the 19th, 20th and 21st, meaning we’ll have a five-day weekend after midterms.  Assuming nothing happens to upset these plans, I’ve booked a room in Ping an at the Longji Rice Terraces, also known as the “Dragon’s Spine,” north of Guilin.

Pomelos and apples

Pomelos and apples

a dark and dreary day

a dark and dreary day

Of course I have a list of things to do and see in Nanning itself, so I ventured out Friday to the Guangxi Museum of Nationalities.  Today I went to Wu li ting Market, not too far a walk from the main gate of the University.  The students from my English Interest Course had told me about this market, which, as they mentioned, is bigger than the market on campus, but not hugely so.  Though the rain slacked off today, it was still overcast and cool, and the light seemed uncooperative for pictures.   I did capture the essence of the market, I think, and I found the vendors friendly and gracious.

Grapes and lady in red

Grapes and lady in red

jujube and vendor

jujube and vendor

I'm not sure what these are: melon and durian perhaps?

I’m not sure what these are: melon and durian perhaps?

pomelo and dragon fruit

pomelo and dragon fruit

relishes

relishes

the vegetable lady

the vegetable lady

greenery at its finest

greenery at its finest

arrangement

arrangement

bed of eggplants

bed of eggplants

vegetable city

vegetable city

On my way back from the market, the construction for the new underground railway, which won’t open until well after I’ve left China, was as jarring as always.  This sight is always a striking contrast to the leafy pond-dotted campus of Guangxi University.

Construction for the new underground railway

Construction for the new underground railway

work in progress

work in progress

towers of steel

towers of steel

We have our Writing midterm on Monday morning, at which time I will have to mark 71 papers with two essays each, a total of 142 essays.  I dread this.  In addition to marking those papers, we’re to continue teaching classes following our normal schedules.  I hope to come out from my solitary marking confinement sometime before next weekend, when hopefully the rain will stop and the air will glow with ribbons of sunlight.

Advertisements
Categories: Asia, China, Chinese markets, Expat life, Guangxi University, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Nanning, Sino-Canadian International College (SCIC), Teaching English as a Second Language, Wu li ting Market | Tags: , , , , , , , | 28 Comments

Post navigation

28 thoughts on “wu li ting market & a sunday invigilation

  1. Fun with fruit, Cathy! 🙂 And Ping! What a great place name 🙂

    Like

    • Yes, it was an okay market, Jo, but not one of the best I’ve been to. I’ll have to try some of these fruits while i’m here. Oh the place is PING AN. It is quite a cute name. 🙂 Have a happy Monday walk. 🙂

      Like

  2. Do you buy some of those unknowns just to try them? The problem would be figuring out how to fix them, I guess. I’d need a recipe book or classes, probably.

    Like

    • Carol, so far I’ve tried dragon fruit, pomelos (my new favorite), jujube, green oranges and Asian pears. I still need to try the durian. I honestly don’t know what half of the stuff in the market is!! I need a class for sure. 🙂

      Like

  3. Yes, that’s durian!

    Like

  4. Such a great variety of fruit, Cathy. You should be very healthy if you try it all. 🙂 Good luck with the marking. That’s an awful lot of essays to wade through. I hope they’re interesting. xx

    Like

    • I wish I was more of a fruit lover, Sylvia, and I know my sons wish I were too, but for some reason, I am never drawn to it. I love vegetables and cheese, and salty things, but I’m not a big fan of sweets, even when they’re natural sweets from fruits. That being said, I have tried the pomelo and I’m becoming addicted to that.

      As of today, I’ve finished 55 of my 71 papers (two essays on each paper). I’ve been hunkering down and focusing on knocking them out. At least I get to look forward to a break to at the Longji Rice Terraces once all my grades are in next Tuesday. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • I think Pomelo is a lot like grapefruit. I’m sure the vitamin C does you a lot of good. Well done with the marking. You’re winning the battle. 🙂

        Like

      • I like the Pomelo, Sylvia, but it is rather hard to eat. I need to figure out the secret of eating it because I actually like it quite a bit.

        Finally, all my marking is done and I’ve turned in my exams and marks. I can breathe again, thank goodness! I’m off to the rice terraces tomorrow. Can’t wait!!! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • I found this video on how to peel a Pomelo. It looks quite time consuming, but not too messy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4K2P-fO2eM

        Enjoy your free time tomorrow. 🙂

        Like

      • That video was exactly my experience, Sylvia. It’s a real pain and very time consuming, but pomelos really are delicious when you finally get down to the pulp!! I’m glad you sent this so I can see that I was doing okay just figuring it out on my own. However, I was hoping your video would show me an easier way!! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  5. What an abundance of fresh fruit and vegetables. Your marking sounds like my world at the moment – 31 children x 8 subject areas to report on = many hours of work. It’s less than five weeks till our 6 weeks of summer holidays so that’s something to look forward to.

    Like

    • Oh dear, Carol, I’m sorry you’re under the gun too. I guess we as teachers shouldn’t complain too much because after all, we do get more time off than people in other professions. We really do have to work for that time off, don’t we?

      Like

      • By the time I add up the mega-hours spent on these reports my extra time off is more than made up for. I think people who don’t know a teacher don’t really understand the extra work we do. Lucky I like my job.

        Liked by 1 person

      • You are so right about that, Carol. I don’t know if we’re compensated nearly enough for the work we do as teachers. I don’t mind my job, but it isn’t my dream job. I do it mainly for the travel. That being said, my Chinese students are my favorites so far of all the nationalities I’ve taught. 🙂

        Like

      • I’m happy enough doing my job…and let’s face it. It pays for the next holiday!

        Like

      • That’s for sure, Carol. That’s the payoff. 🙂

        Like

  6. When we travel one of our stops in each destination is the local market. They’re always fun and are a great way to learn about the local culture; what they eat, drink, and what they buy to meet their daily needs. Your photos of the vendors are a good addition to the veggie and fruit shots. Nice post Cathy. ~James

    Like

    • Thanks so much, James. I too love to explore markets when I travel. On this day, I was disappointed by the lighting, which made the photos quite disappointing. I need to get better with photography to deal with these poor light situations.

      Like

  7. The market is full of such wonderful colour – so much more vibrant than our fruit/veg markets here. I recognised the durian before I read your caption – I am told that you should ignore the smell and eat it, but I never did manage to pluck up the courage when I saw (and smelled) them in Malaysia and Thailand.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. The fruit and veg in this market look wonderful Cathy – so fresh and colourful. I’d stay away from the Durian though 😉
    Are you eating lots of healthy stir-fry veg dishes then? If so you must becoming very streamlined 🙂

    Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Megadiverse Piedmont

Farming an acre in the Upper Wolf Island Creek subwatershed in the Roanoke River basin.

Ravi'S Blog

Java Fever

John SterVens' Tales

Thee Life, Thee Heart, Thee Tears

Set SerenDestiny in Motion

"Lead the Life You're Meant to Live"

Romancing Reality

Linda Grashoff's Photography Adventures

Jill's Scene

A small town take on the big, wide world

eatprayjade

eating and traveling in pursuit of la dolce vita

Japan Wonders

Exploring Japan's popular tourist spots and off-the-beaten path

A lot from Lydia

You can learn a lot from Lydia...(It's a song, not a promise.)

Ink Arts by Carol

My site for offering my alcohol ink arts

I see Beauty everyday

Blessed be the ones that see beauty where others see nothing

BOOKING IT

Debra's Excellent Adventures in Reading and Travel

Marsha Ingrao

Traveling & Blogging Near and Far

PIRAN CAFÉ

Notebooks from a trampfest. Travel tips, tales and images, online since 2006.

Word Wabbit

Wrestless Word Wrestler

Cardinal Guzman

Encyclopedia Miscellaneous - 'quality' blogging since August 2011

Pit's Fritztown News

A German Expat's Life in Fredericksburg/Texas

Under a Cornish Sky

inspired by the colours of the land, sea and sky of Cornwall

sloveniangirlabroad.wordpress.com/

A blog about expat life and travel adventures written by an Slovenian girl living in Switzerland

Let Me Bite That

Can I have a bite?

Running Stories by Jerry Lewis

Personal blog about running adventures

Finding NYC

exploring New York City one adventure at a time

The World according to Dina

Notes on Seeing, Reading & Writing, Living & Loving in The North

%d bloggers like this: