the yangshuo countryside & xianggong hill

Friday, January 30: After leaving the tea plantation, we head north, passing through boundless farmland.  The kumquat orchards sprawl over rolling mountains, less sharp around the edges than the karsts; these mountains are clustered in the midst of the karsts between Yangshuo and Guilin.

Here are two views of the same valley, but in the first one you can see the karsts in the distance, and in the second you can see the road to the village.  For some reason, I love that little road, snuggling up to the edge of that mountain.

view of a farming village along the way

view of a farming village along the way

the view of the road to the village with karsts in the distance

the view of the road to the village with karsts in the distance

Along the way, we stop at a view-point where we can see, to our north, the famous karsts of Xingping, and beneath us, the Li River winding its way through the jagged peaks.

view of the Li River

view of the Li River

View of the Li River

View of the Li River

me with Mike at a stopping point overlooking the Li River

me with Mike at a stopping point overlooking the Li River

View north to Xingping

View north to Xingping

View south to farmland and karsts

View south to farmland and karsts

We continue our drive with Vivian’s husband.  He knows all the same places to stop that Vivian stopped with me in October.  I don’t even need to ask him to pull over.  This is a gorgeous valley filled with villages, kumquat farms, forests and other farmland.

valley of karsts

valley of karsts

I love how the karsts fade into the mist the further away they get.

karst landscape

karst landscape

to infinity and beyond

to infinity and beyond

stunning landscape

stunning landscape

final view of the valley

final view of the valley

Finally we end up at Xianggong Hill, where we climb hundreds of steps to the top; here we can see Xingping to our south, with its CNY 20 Banknote View and Chaoban Hill, among many others.  To the north, we can see Nine-Horse Fresco Hill.  Other peaks around Xianggong Hill have names such as Wave Stone View, Lad Worships Goddess, Grandpa Watching Apple, Chicken Cage Hill, Lion Hill, Pen Holder Peak, and Carp Wall.

Looking south to Xingping

Looking south to Xingping

The view north of Nine-Horse Fresco Hill

The view north to Nine-Horse Fresco Hill

Looking west to Lion Hill and other peaks whose names I don't know

Looking west to Lion Hill and other peaks whose names I don’t know

Northerly view

Northerly view

Village across the Li River form Xianggong Hill

Village across the Li River from Xianggong Hill

Mike atop Xianggong HIll

Mike atop Xianggong HIll

Looking across the Li River from Xianggang Hill to the villages

Looking across the Li River from Xianggong Hill to the villages

Me atop Xianggong Hill

Me atop Xianggong Hill

Looking northeasterly

Looking northeasterly

After we leave Xianggong Hill, we continue on our way to Guilin, making one more photo stop along the way.

Green fields and karsts

Green fields and karsts

marching orders

marching orders

as far as the eye can see

as far as the eye can see

Back in Guilin, which is just another sprawling Chinese city, we head directly to our hotel, The Guilinyi Royal Palace, where we pamper ourselves on the last night of our holiday together.

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Categories: Asia, China, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Guilin, Li River, Nine Horse Fresco Hill, Travel, Xianggong Hill, Xingping, Yangshuo | Tags: , , , , , , | 20 Comments

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20 thoughts on “the yangshuo countryside & xianggong hill

  1. Beautiful photos. Wish I could see all of this when I am in Shanghai next week.

    Liked by 1 person

    • When are you leaving, Vivian? I wish you could too, but Shanghai is a long way from Yangshuo. And there’s not an easy way to get there. 🙂

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      • Shanghai is amazing! Especially on Sunday’s when there are 2 million people all shopping at once! ;.)

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      • How exciting! I can’t wait to read all about it! I was able to follow your blog, but it will only appear in my Reader, which I don’t get to look at much. You might want to consider adding a widget so people can sign up to receive notifications of new posts by email. 🙂

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  2. The karsts are just amazing – they look like something from another world!

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  3. Incredible scenery, but yes, much better in the sunshine 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. It really is an amazing landscape and your photos with the green fields, wowsers!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. It’s still raining but at least you’re still smiling! The scenery was gorgeous and the baby ox was cute too. So was Mike 🙂

    Nancy

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Nancy. I tried to keep smiling, as I foolishly kept hoping the rain would stop. How ridiculous is that? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • What else were you going to do? Cry? It’s unfortunate that it rained and you were so miserable, but there was no changing that. At least you put on a brave face and tried to make the best of it. Pat yourself on the back and tell yourself how awesome you are!!

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      • There was no point in crying, I guess, Nancy, but sometimes it does feel good to have a cry. I did have a great time traveling through challenging China with Mike (it would have been much worse had I been alone!). Lucky for me, I did have a whole month of a wonderful holiday in Yunnan and Myanmar after Mike left. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  6. The scenery looks surreal at times, Cathy, with its jagged karsts in the mist. You amaze me with your detail for directions and mountain names. Makes for a well documented piece. Thanks for sharing this incredible trip.

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    • Thanks so much, Lynne. I’m glad you like my details. I keep maps of every place we go, and if they’re in English, which they’re often not, I refer to them when composing my post. It is a really surreal landscape, isn’t it? 🙂

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  7. Fantastic scenery Cathy. The mist just makes it look more amazing.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. It’s such a lovely landscape, Cathy, even when ‘murky’! 🙂 Imagine how differently you would feel if you’d been born there (and where you might have ended up?). I do like ‘marching orders’. Let’s go! 🙂

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    • Thanks, Jo. I agree, it is still lovely, even when “murky” (what a perfect word by the way). It looks much better to the eye than to the camera on days like we had. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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