the beihai golden bay mangrove ecotourist region

Saturday, June 6:  After Mari and I visit Beibuwan Square, we head to the Beihai Golden Bay Mangrove Ecotourist Region.  I don’t know what to expect, as I don’t even know what mangroves are.

Later, I find on Wikipedia: Mangrove that mangroves are types of trees up to medium height and shrubs that grow in saline coastal sediment habitats in the tropics and subtropics —mainly between latitudes 25° N and 25° S.

We hop in the open air banana-yellow tram shown below, and drive down a long road by the bay, where we’re deposited at a boardwalk that meanders through the mangroves.

our mode of transportation at the mangrove bay

our mode of transportation at the mangrove bay

Entrance to the beihai golden bay mangrove ecotourist region

Entrance to the beihai golden bay mangrove ecotourist region

walkway through the beihai golden bay mangrove ecotourist region

walkway through the beihai golden bay mangrove ecotourist region

Mangroves are salt tolerant trees (halophytes) adapted to live in harsh coastal conditions. They contain a complex salt filtration system and complex root system to cope with salt water immersion and wave action. They are adapted to the low oxygen (anoxic) conditions of waterlogged mud (Wikipedia: Mangrove).

They are often referred to as “forests in the sea.”  The mangrove tree’s seeds remain hanging on the mother tree until saplings appear. Some then fall into the mud and take root, while others are carried to other areas by seawater. The mangrove tree has speedy reproduction and growth. Eventually the tree roots and branches mix up, creating a kind of natural beauty (Roam China: Mangrove Forest).

mangroves

mangroves

From the boardwalk, we can see mudskippers and fiddler crabs skittering around in the muddy swamp.  We can see a pavilion and the sea and acres and acres of the dusty mangroves.

walkway through the mangroves

walkway through the mangroves

mangrove bay

mangrove bay

gnarly mangroves

gnarly mangroves

We continue our stroll, and I for one am looking forward to following the boardwalk out to the pavilion near the sea.

pavilion in the mangroves

pavilion in the mangroves

However, we soon find there is no longer a pathway as it has fallen into disrepair.

remnants of a walkway to the pavilion

remnants of a walkway to the pavilion

a sign along the way

a sign along the way

following the walkway

following the walkway

meandering

meandering

looking out to the bay

looking out to the bay

tidepools

tide pools

As we look out to sea, we can spot a fisherman slowly making his way back to the road.

more tidepools

more tide pools

a man of the sea

a man of the sea

fisherman

fisherman

heading home

heading home

At the end of the mangrove area, we hop on the tram again.  It drops us at the end of the park, which we think will have something else interesting to see.  In fact, it is just a disheveled children’s playground and picnic area, so commonly seen in China.  We do encounter some fashionably dressed ladies on motorbikes.

motorbike lady

motorbike lady

high fashion

high fashion

We find this old boat on the shore and pause to take some photos.

a fancy boat

a fancy boat

Mari and the boat

Mari and the boat

boats on the bay

boats on the bay

boats at bay

boats at bay

rompers on the beach

rompers on the beach

Finally, we get back on the tram to return to the park entrance.  Mari wants to take me to Beihai’s famous Silver Beach, a surprisingly strange place!

Advertisements
Categories: Asia, Beihai, beihai golden bay mangrove ecotourist region, China, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Post navigation

14 thoughts on “the beihai golden bay mangrove ecotourist region

  1. This is uber whimsical! It speaks of ancient times!

    Like

  2. I enjoy boardwalks, mostly because they’re not often up steep hills! Also because they go to places you can’t walk by yourself. That minibus looks like a cool way to get around…literally!

    Like

    • I love boardwalks too, Carol, and for the same reason, they’re usually flat! That minibus was a fun way to get around, although it was quite hot and humid and not really cooling! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. The mangrove swamp looks very interesting, and I think I would have enjoyed the walk along the boardwalk. What a shame that the path had fallen into disrepair and you couldn’t get to the little pavilion.

    Like

    • I was surprised at how muddy the mangrove swamp was, and how dusty and sad the mangroves looked, Elaine, but I’d never seen mangroves before and really had a different expectation. I did learn something new though! I loved the walk along the boardwalk; I always do love a boardwalk! I was so disappointed to find I couldn’t get to the pavilion. But it was great to catch that fisherman strolling back. 🙂

      Like

  4. So mangroves and salt marshes are very similar, in fact, Cathy? That’s a very cute little boat 🙂

    Like

  5. I’ve just been trying to think if I’ve ever seen mangroves. I’ve seen a mangrove snake at a snake farm in Bangkok. It was a really aggressive little monster too. I’ve also seen salt flats in Sri Lanka. Have you seen the Salt Lake in Utah, Kat ?

    Like

    • That would have been interesting to see a mangrove snake in the mangrove swamp, Dai! I haven’t seen the Salt Lake in Utah. Utah has so many great places to see, so I really need to get there sometime! 🙂

      Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Japan Wonders

Exploring Japan's popular tourist spots and off-the-beaten path

A lot from Lydia

You can learn a lot from Lydia...(It's a song, not a promise.)

Ink Arts by Carol

My site for offering my alcohol ink arts

I see Beauty everyday

Blessed be the ones that see beauty where others see nothing

BOOKING IT

Debra's Excellent Adventures in Reading and Travel

Marsha Ingrao

Traveling & Blogging Near and Far

PIRAN CAFÉ

Notebooks from a trampfest. Travel tips, tales and images, online since 2006.

Word Wabbit

Wrestless Word Wrestler

Cardinal Guzman

Encyclopedia Miscellaneous - 'quality' blogging since August 2011

A Faraway Home

Stories and tips from home and far away

Pit's Fritztown News

A German Expat's Life in Fredericksburg/Texas

Under a Cornish Sky

inspired by the colours of the land, sea and sky of Cornwall

sloveniangirlabroad.wordpress.com/

A blog about expat life and travel adventures written by an Slovenian girl living in Switzerland

Let Me Bite That

Can I have a bite?

Running Stories by Jerry Lewis

Personal blog about running adventures

Finding NYC

exploring New York City one adventure at a time

The World according to Dina

Notes on Seeing, Reading & Writing, Living & Loving in The North

snippetsandsnaps

Potato Point and beyond

Storyshucker

A blog full of humorous and poignant observations.

The Eye of a Thieving Magpie

My view of this wonderful and crazy life - as I travel and explore.

renateflynn.wordpress.com/

A (Mostly) Solo Female Exploring the World

NYLON DAZE

From London to New York, living in an expat daze

Blue Hour Photo Workshops

Photography is a constant travel to new places

Travel Much?

Never cease to explore and tell!

%d bloggers like this: