the first half of the hike from ping’an village to the longji rice terraces

Saturday, June 27:  This morning, I decide not to eat anything for breakfast because the last time I took the 5-hour hike to the Longji Rice Terraces and Longji Ancient Zhuang Village, I had a number of stomach problems I don’t care to repeat. I did this hike on November 21, 2014 (a 5-hour hike to the longji rice terraces at longji ancient zhuang village), and the colors at that time were glowing and golden.  Now that it’s summer, the terraces are green and filled with water, making for a whole different experience.

I start hiking through Ping’An Village, where the villagers are already busy at work.

The village of Ping'An from the Longji International Youth Hostel

The village of Ping’An from the Longji International Youth Hostel

view from the deck of the hostel

view from the deck of the hostel

construction in progress

construction in progress

I encounter the Zhuang women in the streets, preparing their vegetables and wares for sale.

ladies preparing vegetables in the streets of Ping'An

ladies preparing vegetables in the streets of Ping’An

I pass by the cheerful sign at the MeiYou Cafe.

MeiYou Cafe

MeiYou Cafe

more of Ping'An Village on the hill

more of Ping’An Village on the hill

some kind of veggies, but not sure what. Rice?

some kind of veggies, but not sure what. Rice?

Rooftops of Ping'An from the hilltops

Rooftops of Ping’An from the hilltops

Finally, I reach the edge of the village, where I have my first view of Seven Stars with Moon.

First view of the rice terraces upon leaving the village en route to Longji

First view of the rice terraces upon leaving the village en route to Longji

Rice terraces

Seven Stars with Moon

Rice terraces outside of Ping'An

Rice terraces outside of Ping’An

Rice terraces

Rice terraces

Rice terraces

Seven Stars with Moon

Rice terraces

Seven Stars with Moon

As I’m walking along the edge of Seven Stars with Moon, I meet two Chinese girls who speak excellent English.  We have a little chat.  They want some pictures with me, and then they ask me to take a picture of them.

me with two Chinese girls

me with two Chinese girls

The path is very narrow, so I have to fall back into the ferns on the edge of a terrace to take their picture.  When I do that, they take a picture of me.

me pushed up against a terrace trying to take a pic of the Chinese girls

me pushed up against a terrace trying to take a pic of the Chinese girls

Rice terraces

Seven Stars with Moon

Then they take a picture of me with Seven Stars with Moon.  I love the names the Chinese give to natural places.

Me at the rice terraces on my hike

Me at Seven Stars with Moon on my hike

Seven Stars with Moon

Seven Stars with Moon

 

Seven Stars with Moon

Seven Stars with Moon

Seven Stars with Moon

Seven Stars with Moon

Seven Stars with Moon

Seven Stars with Moon

Seven Stars with Moon

Seven Stars with Moon

I continue on my walk until I reach a little bridge, where I stop and sit for a bit.  It’s quite hot and humid today, as always seems to be the case in Guangxi province.

the bridge on the hike to Longji

the bridge on the hike to Longji

After a long walk through a wooded area, I come out at the other end, near the Longji Rice Terraces, and I get my first amazing views.

heading toward the Longji Rice Terraces

heading toward the Longji Rice Terraces

water in the terraces

water in the terraces

close up of the water in the rice terraces

close up of the water in the rice terraces

I pass some men building a house or a barn, I’m not sure what.

a construction project along the way

a construction project along the way

view on the hike

view on the hike

dragonfly

dragonfly

I catch my first glimpse of Longji Ancient Zhuang Village and the houses and farms on the outskirts.

coming out of the woods and approaching the village of Longji

coming out of the woods and approaching the village of Longji

outskirts of Longji

outskirts of Longji

a flowery view

a flowery view

I pass some Chinese tourists carrying umbrellas even though it is neither raining nor sunny.

Chinese tourists walking in the terraces

Chinese tourists walking in the terraces

lotus plants and rice

lotus plants and rice

the path ahead

the path ahead

the terraces

the terraces

The views are amazing and I just continue on my way.  The views are so beautiful they take my breath away.  As I approach the far end of my hike, there are more tourists.  Chinese tourists generally don’t go in for long hikes.  Most of the time, they stay huddled together in crowds and don’t venture off onto areas by themselves.  Thus, on the hike from Ping’An to Longji, I’ve seen hardly any people until this point, the separate entrance to the rice terraces.

Click on any of the images below for a full-sized slide show.

As I reach the Longji Terraces, there are amazing views of pancake-stacked terraces, as the land has been carefully carved into contours over the centuries.

The Longji Rice Terraces

The Longji Rice Terraces

layers and layers

layers and layers

a contoured landscape

a contoured landscape

The Longji Rice Terraces

The Longji Rice Terraces

The Longji Rice Terraces

The Longji Rice Terraces

The Longji Rice Terraces

The Longji Rice Terraces

the Longji Rice Terraces at the viewpoint

the Longji Rice Terraces at the viewpoint

I finally reach my turn-around point, the touristy entrance to the Longji Terraces.  It’s been a long walk, about 2 hours, and now I will turn around and return to Ping’An, retracing my steps, with a detour into Longji Ancient Zhuang Village.  Because of this detour, it will take me about 3 hours to make my way back.

Tourist shops at the entrance to the Longji Rice Terraces

Tourist shops at the entrance to the Longji Rice Terraces

Tourist shops at Longji

Tourist shops at Longji

I stop for the “official view” with the stone carving commemorating the Longji Rice Terraces.

Stone marker for the Longji Rice Terraces

Stone marker for the Longji Rice Terraces

After one last look at the rice terraces from the stone marker overlook, I begin to make my way back, taking the lower path to walk through Longji Ancient Zhuang Village.

Looking back from where I came

Looking back from where I came

Oh, how I love this place! 🙂

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Categories: Asia, China, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Longji Rice Terraces, Longsheng County, Ping'An Village, Seven Stars with Moon | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 26 Comments

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26 thoughts on “the first half of the hike from ping’an village to the longji rice terraces

  1. Beautiful pictures! I bet you miss all the beautiful scenery and colors there! Places here in the states are not so colorful! Thanks for taking us through all your journeys! I do not know if I will ever make it to China but who knows! We never thought we would ever make it to South Korea! 😊 Take care! 💕

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    • Thanks so much, Theresa. I loved these rice terraces. I never heard what you thought about Korea, or if you told me, now I’ve forgotten (blame it on my age!). I hope you enjoyed it! You never know, you just may make it to China one day!

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  2. Delightful! Not surprised you love it.

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  3. I can see why you love it too, it’s remarkable and interesting to see it in a different season as well!

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    • I was really excited to see the terraces in summer, Gilly, and I would have been really disappointed in myself if I hadn’t made that trip! I loved the different look in the warmer season. 🙂

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  4. The rice terraces are a marvel – to see them in real life must be breathtaking.

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  5. I also love some of the names they give to songs and music. American Indians do/did the same. The name ‘Wind in his hair’ comes to mind. Was that in the movie ‘Dances with Wolves’ Kat ? I was talking a lot about China and my travels with friends here this weekend.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I hope you were having happy memories of your time in China, Dai. I don’t remember whether that song was in Dances with Wolves, although I do remember that movie. Glad you had a nice trip down memory lane. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kat, Ihave lots of good memories of China and not many negative ones. I wish the Chinese here in Lisbon were more like the Chinese in China. If you want to experience real hostility, walk into a Chinese shop in Lisbon and try to be a customer.

        Liked by 1 person

      • The Chinese in China are pretty great, overall, I have to say. My students especially, who are always texting me still and telling me how much they miss me! I just got a text this morning. They’re the best. I’m sorry about the Chinese shopkeepers in Lisbon. 😦

        Liked by 1 person

      • You are still getting texts. That’s nice Kat.

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  6. These photos look so familiar yet different! Poor brick-laden horse!

    I am glad you had a chance to revisit places that meant something and were worth the nightmare it took to get anywhere on a weekend or holiday in China. I would not have seen anything in Oman if it were not for you – I am so glad you gave me a chance to have some nice memories in a place I did not much care for scenery-wise when you invited me along for one your “one last visit” sojourns there – I feel like you are doing the same for me with China.

    So glad you are home now! P.S. You look very slim in these photos! Where is that weight you said you gained?!

    😀

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    • I’m glad too that I went back to this place, Mona Lisa. It really is so dreamy, nestled in the mountains as it is with all those terraces. I am really glad I braved the trip and went back!

      I still have lots more pictures to come. Plus Myanmar, and my recent pics of my weekend in Chincoteague, a walk at the Virginia Arboretum and a meeting with Toby, another blogger, at the National Art Gallery. I’m finally starting to catch up and just did a cocktail hour on my other blog, finally, after 2 months!

      I’m glad you came along on some of my Oman outings. The one we did to Jebel Akhdar with Beg on Valentine’s Day was a really fun one, wasn’t it?

      I’m glad you think I look slim in these photos. The camera must be deceiving! Did you get my message on FB that I got the movies? We really enjoyed Enlightenment Guaranteed and Mike keeps trying to demonstrate the mopping the floor moves of the brothers in the monastery! He can do it quite well. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Irena is not looking forward to her time in China, she leaves at the end of this month though she has had no contact with the employer regarding who is picking her up, where to go, visa, etc. Did you have that all come last minute, too? She does not seem that interested in travelling around. It is sad, she has a ton of money, a huge pension waiting for her, no problems with her children or work or anything, and total freedom regarding renting out her homes, etc. while away. But yet she says she looks forward to nothing and is never happy. I don’t care what anyone says, especially when you well past the flower of your youth, money DOES buy happiness as money = freedom to do just about anything. The greatest source of stress for most of us is financial worry, health and family. In that order in my opinion, though I cannot speak for everyone. I cannot understand the source of her misery though, and it is very sad to me that her outstanding financial situation and good health and opportunities to travel and work without fear of not eaning enough bring her no joy whatsoever. xxx

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      • Where will Irena be in China? I did have a lot of last minute stuff going on before I went, and it was really discombobulating when I arrived at the Nanning airport and no one was there to pick me up until a half-hour after the appointed time! I feared no one was going to pick me up and I would have no idea where to go with my two huge suitcases. Thank goodness they did finally come and all went fairly smoothly after that. It’s great for Irena that she does have money and no problems with family, etc. but that shows that money does not buy happiness. I think your order should be health, financial worry, and finally family. If your health is bad, no matter how much money you have, it’s hard to be happy. She always seemed like a bitter person to me; some people are doomed to utter unhappiness. I think it’s a choice to try to make the best of things and be grateful, or not. xxx

        Liked by 1 person

      • Zhengzhou is were she is going. Not sure which university or anything else as I think she is there now. Same thing as you, no word as to what would happen upon arrival.

        Yes, she is a rather negative person, hates teaching and hates students, but yet she hooked up with such a nice man, John from USA. Remember him, very quiet? They visit together and she won’t say what kind of relationship it is, but then again she went to Viet Nam for two weeks to visit with Warwick and there was certainly no love there. John was in Saudi for a while but he did not last if I remember correctly. Jeez I hate when I cannot remember stuff. Time to write it down and/or make photocopies. I am normally that way inclined but today I got some tax stuff at work for my boss and the accountant said, I left you notes do what I said. ??????????????????? No clue there. I gave her notes to my boss last week or two weeks ago but beyond that I have no memory. Now I know to make copies of her notes, as I have a manual for myself I made with all that but this one thing I fogot or was not mindful enough about.

        I don’t think Irena really wants to be in China, she just wanted one more work assignment abroad. My God with her money I would be working in places I wanted to be like Latin America so I could perfect my Spanish!! Right now I just applied for French 1 of an online 6-semester French certification course which will take 2 years at $400 per course. I won $1000 in a raffle last week through my boss’ ski club (I never buy lottery tickets or gamble or buy raffle tickets but he did my legal paperwork for my German passport and he would not take money but he would sell me raffle tickets and I bought a book of 12 and won the grand prize hahaha!) and that will pay for almost half of that. I may lose my disability pension which means I will be scrambling if I don’t get that renewed. I have a good job but the pay is poverty line. What is better, a horrible stressful job you hate working for someone you don;t like or respect for more money or a job you love with a boss you adore whch pays you barely enough to keep you alive, but you have no stress? I am staying put!! xxx

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  7. It really is an amazing landscape, Cathy! Did you decide that you liked this area better than the karsts? You didn’t have much luck with the weather when you visited them and that affects your outlook, doesn’t it? 🙂

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    • I did love this area more than the karsts, Jo, mainly because it was so remote and there weren’t as many people. The karsts are a big tourist destination in Guangxi; most tourists to China have them on their itineraries. Also, many Chinese travel there. Because the rice terraces are harder to get to, there are far fewer people. The Yangshuo area (with the karsts) is also typically hazy and humid (and hot or alternatively cold & damp). The rice terraces are a little more temperate because they are so high in the mountains. It was still warm and humid, but not as much so. 🙂

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      • Happy days! 🙂 We’re off to the Lakes tomorrow, Cathy, just for an overnight, and the forecast is pretty much wet, wet, wet! 😦 There’s a lovely inn with a view right up the lake but I doubt I’ll be able to see much. Have to find some other activities. 🙂 🙂

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      • Oh boy, the Lakes!! I love the Lake District. I wish we had digital photos from our trip there in 1999; I guess I could someday scan them in, if I ever found the time! Have fun and stay dry, Jo. I’m sure you’ll be able to find something to do to keep you occupied, only if it’s eating some great meals accompanied by wine. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  8. It was so worth the effort to go back Cathy. What beautiful scenery.

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